short stories

~ Clinging on ~

pexels-photo-220444

~ Clinging on ~

I stood on the ledge of the building. I looked down at the concrete below. It would be instant if I made sure to land head first. Ten stories was enough to take me away on a final one-way ticket out of this place. Overdosing on pills would have been easier, but I was feeling a dramatic exit would be the right way to end this thing once and for all. I wanted the blood and guts of me staining those streets that had slowly pushed me to the brink over the years; I wanted my inner pain running into the gutters and sewers where it belonged. I shuffled my feet closer until the toes were over the edge. I had been totally ready for a few months now, and yes – I still felt ready. I shuffled closer. And closer. I stood on the precipice and looked straight ahead. My life did not flash before my eyes. There was no great symphony playing in my head. No angel came down to talk me out of it. There was no sound at all but the usual distant wailing of a siren and the sound of some seagulls squawking.

No, it was just me and the thoughts in my head like it had always been as I stood there reflecting on the inevitability of the moment. I thought of all the things that had led me to that ledge. The loneliness and separation that had sent me insane all my life. The homesickness for a place I’d never known. The relentless lack of connection to absolutely anybody else. It was true that the only people I related to were those who had either died by their own hand or drank themselves to death. Van Gogh, Hemingway, Hunter Thompson, Alan Watts, Kobain, Kerouac…  Charles Bukowski somehow made it through the fire with a rare victory to die relatively normally, although he had dodged death and darkness a few times too. It was clear to me that some people were born foreign strangers in this world – and a combination of being misunderstood, alienated and highly incompatible with society – is ultimately what made them blow their brains out with shotguns and drink themselves to death. Those warriors of the word had evidently written themselves into history, but I thought of what would happen in my case. A few flowers here and there. Some people on social media making me out to be an angel of some sort. Sure enough a few weeks later the flowers would wilt and die, and people would move on – my name only occasionally mentioned in circles of close friends. “Terrible what happened.” “He seemed so happy.” “I don’t know what happened.” “We never saw it coming.” The thought of it only got worse as I imagined the funeral with the black clothes and the reading of dogmatic religious texts – the final spit-in-the-face insult reserved for you before being buried six feet in the ground.

It sounds absurd but the thing that caused me to turn away from that ledge was the fact I hadn’t left anything behind yet. Those heroes of mine who had died by their own hand, they had shared their truth and had provided some fuel for others looking to continue on through the wilderness. There was a tremendous victory in that and a part of me also refused to let my truth fade into the abyss of nothingness. I too wanted whatever was going on inside of me to be felt by another soul out there looking for some salvation. Feeling something inside me begin to twitch, I took myself home where I sat once again before a keyboard with my fingertips fighting for survival – fighting to hold onto the ledge with whatever words and fight I could summon from inside myself.

Like so many others out there, my fight was a solitary one hidden from the view of the people who laid their eyes on me. No one truly knew the extent of my madness but me. For some reason this is how it worked: these internal battles are often the greatest battles of all, and they are not fought in plain sight in boxing rings or battlefields, but instead inside the hearts of people trying to carry on in a world they didn’t understand. They are the battles never read about in history books or commemorated in museums, but instead only known inside the minds of the people fighting them. They are the hidden wars and I can’t help but stare into the eyes of strangers on the street and wonder how many people out there are also fighting their way through the darkness? Who are lingering on the precipice of suicide and madness? Who are trying to find a reason to continue on in a world they just don’t understand? 

No doubt there are so many more than people would like to think – people who may appear very normal and content with their lives. I know many would find it shocking to know that their friends and family members have once stared into the abyss wishing to hurl themselves in – that they didn’t want to continue in the same world they lived in and were a part of. But it was undeniable they were out there in the hundreds of thousands, and that the majority of the time they were almost impossible to spot. This was the secret of the suicidal. True desolation was invisible. A look of sadness in someone’s eye meant there was still some fight and hope left. But when the light truly fades from all around you, one does not feel despair or agony. You simply stop feeling. There is an emptiness which can’t be explained and nonexistence is not something that even feels like a big deal. It feels welcoming. All the reason and fight leaves your veins as you stumble sinisterly towards that precipice of death and darkness. In the meanwhile fake smiles are easily cast and the sentence ‘fine thanks, you?’ is uttered confidently to unsuspecting loved ones. I knew this because I had felt it myself, and also because I had stared into the eyes of suicide cases a couple of times in my life. Both times it was just a few weeks before they finally went through with it. And yes, I did not see it coming. I did not see the desire for death in their eyes. Their pain was masked; their secrets hidden deep within themselves like so many out there who dwell silently in the depths of the greatest darknesses.

I do not know the cure to all this pain and madness that fills so many struggling souls out there. All throughout the world tonight as I write these words there will be people overdosing on pills, putting the blade against the wrist, drinking themselves to death or hurling themselves in front of trains just to escape this world. Some may save themselves from the abyss and others may succumb. I don’t know if I have any advice to offer them; I think maybe I’ve just gotten lucky to have this stubborn streak inside of me that pulls me back from the ledges and nooses. I guess I know I’ll always be a bit of a misunderstood loner, an isolated maniac writing words that no one will ever read, but embracing that and writing all this shit down keeps me from losing it totally. This is my personal cure and if someone ever asks me why I was so compelled to write, I told them it was out of desperation. Desperation to survive. To leave something behind. To make sure my story is heard and understood by others who never understood what was really inside me. It is an act of redemption and when these fingertips touch these keys, I am clinging onto a ledge with words that – if they stayed inside of me – would cement my fate with so many out there who were slowly consumed from within. They are the words of someone hanging on to it all. The words of someone living on the edge. The words of another man who refused to let himself be murdered by the world without a fight.

6 thoughts on “~ Clinging on ~

  1. I wished more people would get the chance to read what you write, Ryan. A lot of people could learn a lot from your writing. What you write is written in such plain language that about everybody would be able to follow it and understand it and learn from it. I am sure there are a lot more words in you to describe what you are feeling. These honest words could be a savior for people that desparately look for some meaning in life!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ahh thanks for the kind words! I also wish more people would read my work haha! Hopefully one day. And thank you in regards to the plain language comment and that anybody would be able to follow and understand it. That is a primary intention of mine when I write so that’s good to know you think that 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Actually, Ryan, when I read all this, I was thinking of my brother, who died recently being nearly 82. His funeral is going to be on the 2nd of June, his birthday is on the 9th of June. So he was born in 1938, being nearly four years younger than I am. I feel bad, that I did not get the chance to get to know him a bit better and did not quite understand what he went through in his life. I cling to some childhood memories. He was a beautiful, very sensitive kid with a lot of imagination. It would have been so good if he could have written something about his thoughts and feelings. But as far as I know he did not leave anything behind.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Awhh may his rip! 82 is a good age and im sure he lived a full life. Very sensitive people with a lot of imagination are sure to have a tougher ride on the rollercoaster than others but in a way it allows you experience life in a much more intense and vivid way. It’s a shame he never left anything behind that you know of. Everybody should try and write something down at some point in their lives, even if just for a few future family members to read through

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Ryan, maybe you’d like to have a look at this picture of my brother Bodo, here in this reblog:

    https://auntyuta.com/2020/05/21/berlin-in-june-2016-2/

    The picture was taken already in 2010 on Bodo’s birthday!
    He is there with two of his mates that he knew already when they were in their teens! His mates Aki and Stummel say they are going to be present at the funeral, also Aki’s wife Ina. For my husband Peter and me air-travel from Australia to Berlin is right now of course out of the question. But my brother Peter-Uwe and his family are going to be at the funeral too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I checked it out, I’m sure that’s a very nice memory for you to have. That’s great that he still kept in touch with his friends from his teens, there’s quite an achievement I’d say! Berlin is a great city, I went there in 2013 after cycling there from Poland. It was quite a trip. Anyway, sorry for your loss, I hope you can at least cherish the memories you have and the fact he lived a long and im sure fruitful life 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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